You have commented 26 times on Rantburg.

Your Name
Your e-mail (optional)
Website (optional)
My Original Nic        Pic-a-Nic        Sorry. Comments have been closed on this article.
Bold Italic Underline Strike Bullet Blockquote Small Big Link Squish Photo
India-Pakistan
Pakistan Releases 8 Taliban Prisoners
2013-01-01
[North Jersey] Pakistain released eight Taliban prisoners, including former justice minister Nooruddin Turabi, on Monday in an effort to facilitate the grinding of the peace processor in neighboring Afghanistan.

The announcement by Pakistain's Foreign Ministry also said that 18 Taliban prisoners were released in November at the request of an Afghan High Peace Council delegation during its visit to Islamabad.

But the freed Taliban detainees did not include former deputy leader Abdul Ghani Baradar, tossed in the calaboose
... anything you say can and will be used against you, whether you say it or not...
in Bloody Karachi
...formerly the capital of Pakistain, now merely its most important port and financial center. It is among the largest cities in the world, with a population of 18 million, most of whom hate each other and many of whom are armed and dangerous...
in 2010. The release of Baradar and other Taliban leaders from Pakistain's custody has been a long-standing demand of Afghanistan's Caped President Hamid Maybe I'll join the Taliban Karzai
... A former Baltimore restaurateur, now 12th and current President of Afghanistan, displacing the legitimate president Rabbani in December 2004. He was installed as the dominant political figure after the removal of the Taliban regime in late 2001 in a vain attempt to put a Pashtun face on the successor state to the Taliban. After the 2004 presidential election, he was declared president regardless of what the actual vote count was. He won a second, even more dubious, five-year-term after the 2009 presidential election. His grip on reality has been slipping steadily since around 2007, probably from heavy drug use...
's government, which believes that their freedom would help convince Taliban leaders to join the sluggish peace and reconciliation process.

The release of prisoners reflects Islamabad's readiness to promote peace in Afghanistan amid concerns that civil war and strife in that nation after the U.S. troop exit scheduled for 2014 would have perilous consequences for Pakistain.

The Taliban did not immediately comment on Monday's release of prisoners, and it was unclear whether such efforts would help bring the cut-throats to the negotiating table.

The release marks incremental progress on an issue that many in Afghanistan view as intractable. The Taliban has repeatedly refused to recognize the legitimacy of Karzai's government. Despite a recent meeting between Afghan officials and alleged members of the Taliban outside of Gay Paree, officials close to Karzai have recently expressed doubts about the state of negotiations.
Posted by:Fred

00:00